The Australian Cockatiel

COCKATIEL:
Genus: Nymphicus- Species: N. hollandicus. Family-  Cacatuidae

A picture of a younge Grey Cockatiel

A picture of a younge Grey Cockatiel from WikiPedia

 

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION: Their distinguishing crest is a unique characteristic, which is exclusive to them and thier larger cousins from the cockatoo family. Their crest is used as a form of communication and is often raised to express fear or as a warning to stay away, but they will also display their crest in excitement and during play. The crest is also used during courting displays.

A picture of a Male Grey Cockatiel

A picture of a Male Grey Cockatiel from WikiPedia

The Wild Cockatiel is a primarily grey bird with white outer wing feathers. Visual sexing (aka: Sexual dimorphism) is gernerally possible with the cockatiel. The adult male generally have bright yelow or white  feathers on his face and crest while the females tends to have a grey face and crest, the females also have white or yellow barring and spots on the underside of thier tail feathers and wings.

A picture of a Female Grey Cockatiel

A picture of a Female Grey. Notice the stripped barring on her tail feathers, this is a good visual clue to the sex of your cocatiel... from WikiPedia

Both sexes have a bright orange areas in the shape of a circle on either side of thier faces, theses are known as “cheek patches.”  The male is said to have more vibrant check patches than the female. The adolescent birds resemble the adults and it is particularly difficult to tell the difference between a male and female. The only completely accurate way to determine the sex of your parrot is through DNA testing.

SIZE: Length up to about 30cm, weighting around 90 to 120 gm.

LIFESPAN: Approximately 15 to 20 years

 

DISTRIBUTION & HABITAT: The Cockatiel is native to Australia and is generally found in arid and semi-arid habitats close to a water source.

 They tend to live in pairs and/or small groups but they are social birds and will congregate in very large groups with numbers in the hundreds, around large water sources. They are fairly nomadic in nature and will travel for their water and food sources.

STATUS: Protected species under the Australian Commonwealth Law.

DIET: The Cockatiel feeds mainly on seeds, but also on fruits, buds, flowers, nectar and insects.

Many sites recommend a combination of small parrot seed mix, striped sunflower seeds (not too many), Hulled Oats, Canary Seed, and Japanese and White Millet, as a basis for their seed diet, while other sites recommend parrot pellets or a combination of both. What ever your choice, make sure that your Cockatiel received a daily serve of various fresh fruits and vegetables, sprouts, nuts, flowers, berries and nectar. It is very important that any uneaten or spoilt fruit is removed as soon as possible, through out the day to prevent contamination and fermentation, especially during hot humid weather. You should also supplement their diet with soaked and sprouted seed, seeding grasses, seed heads, and even egg and biscuit mix.

A photo of wild Cockatiels perched on electricity wires. From WikiPedia

A photo of wild Cockatiels perched on electricity wires. From WikiPedia

Cockatiel need a source of protein, which can be obtained with insectivore mixes, insect larvae, mealworms or a protein powder. You also need to maintain adequate levels of vitamins and minerals, there are many types of mineral and vitamin blocks available. I use a mineral perch. Don’t forget the benefits of cuttlefish and shell grit.

Eucalypts branches, leaves and flowers are a natural source of food but when placed throughout their enclosure they also become an important source of entertainment and exercise. Mental stimulation is extremely important for all birds in captivity. It is best to keep all food utensils about one metre above the ground. They also enjoy a dish of water for bathing or they will try to use their drinking water Change their water every day, and frequently clean their cage or aviary to prevent contamination

A photo of one of my baby cockatiels

A photo of one of my baby cockatiels

COMPATIBILITY: The Cockatiel is non aggressive and can sometimes be housed with other parrots of a similar temperment and size, but only in suitable large enclosures and outside of the breeding season. The smaller budgerigars and lovebirds can be very aggressive to the gentler cockatiel  

TEMPERAMENT: Cockatiels are extremely intelligent  They are energetic, playful, mischievous and extremely curious birds which can make them naturally entertaining and funny companions.

PET STATUS: Cockatiels can make wonderful companions for gentle, kind people have loads of patients and heaps of time to spend bonding and entertaining this extremely intelligent bird.

Your Cockatiel can become an extremely affectionate, loyal and loving companion. They can also bond excessively to one particular person, and may even become extremely jealous if other people or birds go near their special human.

Your Cockatiel requires continuous mental stimulation and their strong social nature requires a great deal of ongoing attention and affection. If they are deprived of mental stimulation and/or attention and affection they WILL become depressed and develop neurotic behaviours, including screeching, feather plucking and biting , just to name a few.

A Cockatiel playing with a Bird Toy from www.birdyboredombusters.com

A Cockatiel playing with a Bird Toy from http://www.birdyboredombusters.com

TOYS: Cockatiels love to chew and destroy things, so it is really important to provide plenty of toys and objects for chewing, mental stimulation and to maintain wear on their large beaks and claws.

There are so many toys and objects available, such as swings, play gyms, cuttlefish, wooden and hard plastic toys, leather, cardboard, rope toys, wooden balls and bells. Make sure that you provide toys that you bird can pick up with their feet and beak as well as hanging toys.

Make sure that all your toys are safe, and are also hung or placed in a safe location, to prevent any injury, accidental entrapment or hanging. Also treat them with vegetable flavoured and shaped wood chews, seed bells and various favourite foods serve up all around their enclosure to encourage foraging, exercise and mental stimulation.

You should include numerous and various sized perches, such as wooden perches, soft pliable perch, mineral perches and various sized branches. Natural branches offer the best variety in size, allowing them to maintain fitness and strength in their feet. I like to place fresh, leafy and/or seeded branches from Banksias, Grevilleas and Bottlebrushes, and try to create a maze effect, for simulation. seed bells are an added snack and chew bonus. Once again, make sure that all perches and branches are safe, and hung or placed in a safe location, to prevent any injury, accidental entrapment or hanging.

ABILITY TO TALK: Both the male and female Cockatiel can become wonderful talkers and fantastic sound mimickers, however many consider the male to have a better tendency to becoming a more avid conversationalist. I personal believe that it has more to do with the individual bird’s personality and the amount of time and patience that you share with your cokatiel while you help develop their vocabulary.

LEVEL OF NOISE: The Cockatiel is generally a quite parrot  and is considered one of the best choices for an apartment pet since they have a rather soft and pleasing call.  They rarely screech unless over excited. The male is general said to be the louder.

References: (Viewing date –11th January 2011)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cockatiel
http://www.parrotparrot.com/articles/gettingabird/how-noisy-is-that-parrot/
http://www.birdyboredombusters.com/images/spike.jpg

—————————————————————-

Copyright (c) 2012 All Images are covered by copyright law.
Please contact me, using the comments, if you would like to use
them so were can discuss any arrangements.
Copyright (c) 2012 All Images are covered by copyright law.
Images on this page have been sourced from others sites
and may have specific copyright, please contact them in
relation to their use. Each photo has a link back to the original site.
Some people a kind enough to allow their images to be displayed
in blogs or emails but they still maintain copyright ownership.

EASTERN ROSELLA: Platycercus eximius

The Eastern Rosella is native to Australia and can be found along the south-eastern of coast of Australia, from Queensland to Tasmania and south-east to South Australia.

SUBSPECIES: There are three subspecies of the Eastern Rosella:
<!–[if !supportLists]–>

<!–[if !supportLists]–>v<!–[endif]–>P.e. eximius (Eastern Rosella),

<!–[if !supportLists]–>v<!–[endif]–>P.e. cecilae (Gold-mantled Rosella), and

<!–[if !supportLists]–>v<!–[endif]–>P.e. diemenensis (Tasmania Rosella).

 

 

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION: The head, throat, nape and upper breast of the Eastern Rosella are a brilliant red with contrasting white cheeks. Beneath the brilliant red of the chest are beautiful yellow feathers that gradually merge into a lovely lime like green. This lime like green continues on the birds back and down to their green and blue tail feathers. Their wings start with a wonderful scalloped pattern of black, leopard like, spots that cover a composition of various green and yellow which filters into the wonderful mix of blues and purple of the flight feathers. The under base of the tail is the same brilliant red of the head which offsets the various shades of green and blue tail feathers Their feet and bill are a grayish colour. Females are similar but have a duller appearance with more shades of green and are slightly smaller in size. The females also tend to have an under wing stripe.

HABITAT: The Eastern Rosella is generally found in lightly wooded areas. This little bird has been very successful in adapting too many man made environments such as farms, parks and golf courses. Many of my friends enjoy feeding wild rosies in their backyards. They like to feed early in the morning and dusk. The Eastern Rosella is often seen feeding on the ground and in the trees, and generally in pairs or little groups. Sometimes they will be seen in large flocks, usually at the end of their breeding season.

STATUS: Common
DIET: The Eastern Rosella feeds mainly on seeds, but also on fruits, buds, flowers, nectar and insects.
Many sites recommend a combination of small parrot seed mix, striped sunflower seeds (not too many), Hulled Oats, Canary Seed, and Japanese and White Millet, as a basis for their seed diet, while other sites recommend parrot pellets or a combination of both. What ever your choice, make sure that your Eastern Rosella received a daily serve of various fresh fruits and vegetables, sprouts, nuts, flowers, berries and nectar. It is very important that any uneaten or spoilt fruit is removed as soon as possible, through out the day to prevent contamination and fermentation, especially during hot humid weather. You should also supplement their diet with soaked and sprouted seed, seeding grasses, seed heads, and even egg and biscuit mix.

Rosellas need a source of protein, which can be obtained with insectivore mixes, insect larvae, mealworms or a protein powder. You also need to maintain adequate levels of vitamins and minerals, there are many types of mineral and vitamin blocks available. I use a mineral perch. Don’t forget the benefits of cuttlefish and shell grit.

Eucalypts branches, leaves and flowers are a natural source of food but when placed throughout their enclosure they also become an important source of entertainment and exercise. Mental stimulation is extremely important for all birds in captivity. It is best to keep all food utensils about one metre above the ground. They also enjoy a dish of water for bathing or they will try to use their drinking water Change their water every day, and frequently clean their cage or aviary to prevent contamination

SIZE: Eastern Rosellas are about 30 cm in length and weigh from 90 to 120 gm.

TEMPERAMENT: The beautifully coloured plumage of the Eastern Rosella makes it a stunning inhabitant for your aviary and they usually breed well in captivity. The Eastern Rosella can be a rather curious little bird and have been known to become aggressive if not housed as a single pair. Many species of wild Rosellas will accept seeds and fruits from food trays and bowls left out for wild birds by suburban households.

PET STATUS: Every rosella has its own personality and some can make fantastic companions but can be easily spooked. They don’t always cope with the life of a family pet and even hand-raised birds might struggle. They aren’t cuddly birds and will often bite when handled. A pet rosella will require a lot of social interaction and mental stimulation. This should include consistent and rich interaction and loads of toys and activities to maintain their mental health.

A pet Rosella will quickly revert back to less social behaviour if left alone but more importantly your bird will suffer emotionally. If you don’t think you will have the time then you really should consider purchasing a pair and house them in an outside aviary where you can admire their beauty and antics at a distance. Many breeders believe that Rosellas are better of housed in aviaries with minimal human socialisation.

ABILITY TO TALK: Eastern Rosellas are very intelligent and can be learn to whistle a large selection of tunes. A friend’s pet bird really enjoys whistling a number of popular tunes and is particularly good at the Mickey Mouse song. Unlike many other Australian parrots they have a limited ability to talk but some have learnt to speak a few words or expressions.

LEVEL OF NOISE: The Eastern Rosella is relatively quiet bird when housed alone, but can be become much more vocal when living with or near other birds. Each Rosella has its own call, and their song varies depending on what they are doing.

LIFE SPAN: The rosella is said to live 15 years or more.

References: (Viewing date – 22nd June 2008)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Rosella

http://www.birdkeepinginaustralia.com/articles/article26.html

http://www.birdcare.com.au/rosellas.htm

http://www.bankstown.nsw.gov.au/wdal/pdfcreate.aspx?dn=DROvIuU6Gec%3d

________________________________________________________________________
Copyright (c) 2008 All Images are covered by copyright law.
Please contact me, using the comments, if you would like to use them so were can
discuss any arrangements.

Exempt Species of Native Bird in QLD, Australia

EXEMPT BIRD IN Queensland.
In Queensland you do not require a license to keep or use, lawfully obtained birds on the exempt list.
You can buy, sell or breed exempt birds. There is a clause that states that you cannot “process” them, such as “convert them into another form by a special process such as taxidermy”.
Exempt Bird in QLD may be kept, breed and sold without a license but they are all “protected” and it is illegal to take them from the wild.

You will not require any type of documentation to transport your exempt birds within Queensland and you can transport them without documentation into other states as long as you do not require approval from the wildlife authority of the other State. This is because each State has unique laws on wildlife that must be abided by.

It is also illegal to move Exempt Birds from Queensland for the purpose of moving them to another country or selling, giving or moving them to a person in another country.

Queensland’s Exempt Native Birds

  • Scientific name Common name
  • Coturnix chinensis………………………………….King quail
  • Coturnix pectoralis…………………………………Stubble quail
  • Coturnix ypsilophora………………………………Brown quail
  • Erythrura gouldiae…………………………………..Gouldian finch
  • Geopelia cuneata…………………………………….Diamond dove
  • Geopelia striata……………………………………….Peaceful Dove
  • Melopsittacus undulates…………………………..Budgerigar
  • Neochmia ruficauda, other than N. r. ruficauda
    • Star finch,other than the eastern subspecies
  • Neophema bourkii…………………………………..Bourke’s parrot
  • Neophema elegans………………………………….Elegant parrot
  • Nymphicus hollandicus…………………………..Cockatiel or Quarrion
  • Psephotus haematonotus………………………..Red-rumped parrot
  • Taeniopygia guttata………………………………..Zebra finch

The Exempt Native Birds below are also “Prescribed Licence Exempt Birds”.
When keeping a “Prescribed Licence Exempt Bird” for a commercial purpose you are legally required to keep a record book, even though you don’t require a licence. A record book or electronic record system must be kept up-to-date with details of all transactions and/or number changes of your “Prescribed Licence Exempt Birds”. Records must be amended on the day of the transaction or when the number change occurs. Record Book can be brought at EPA offices and electronic record system must be approved by the EPA chief executive.

  • Neophema splendida ……………………Scarlet-chested parrot*
  • Polytelis alexandrae …………………….Princess parrot or Alexandra’s parrot*
  • Trichoglossus haematodus …………..Rainbow lorikeet*
  • Barnardius zonarius semitorquatus
    • Australian ringneck or Twenty-eight parrot*
  • Cacatua galerita …………………………..Sulphur-crested cockatoo*
  • Cacatua pastinator ………………………Western corella*
  • Cacatua roseicapilla …………………….Galah*
  • Cacatua sanguinea ………………………Little corella*
  • Cacatua tenuirostris …………………….Long-billed corella*
Disclaimer:This document contains general information and is not a legal, professional or commercial document. It is import that you should satisfy yourself independently through your own professional advisors before acting on any course of action

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo: Cacatua galerita – General Information

SULPHUR-CRESTED COCKATOO:
Genus: Cacatua – Species: galerita.
Photo of Australain Sulphur Crested Cockatoo

Photo of Australain Sulphur Crested Cockatoo

SUBSPECIES: there is only four recognised subspecies. Only two are natives of just Australia.

  • Cacatua galerita galerita; is found in eastern Australia and is the most common in captivity. They have a white eye ring, a paler yellow colour around the ear coverts, and shorter crest feathers.
  • Cacatua galerita fitzroyi; Fitzroy Cockatoo is located in north and north-western Australia, They have pale blue eye rings, brighter yellow colour to their ear covert and longer crest feathers. They are the most rare in captivity.
The other two subspecies are only found in Indonesia and Papua-New Guinea and the north of Australia
  • Cacatua galerita triton; Triton Cockatoo, is considered to be very intelligent and the easiest to train. For this reason they are often used to perform in bird shows.
  • Cacatua galerita eleonora; The Eleonora Cockatoo the smallest of the Greater Sulphur Crested Cockatoos and is also known as the Medium Sulphur Crested Cockatoo.
//en.wikipedia.org site

Australian Sulphur Crested Cockatoo - Cacatua galerita. This picture was taken by Amos T Fairchild and located at wikipedia.org site

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION:
The Sulphur Crested Cockatoos is an impressive large white parrot with a striking yellow crest. They have a lovely light tint of yellow just below their eyes near the back of their cheek area. They have a very fine powder that waterproof their feathers. They have yellow feathers under their wings and tail. Both their beak and feet are dark, almost black.

Their distinguishing crest is a unique characteristic, which is exclusive to only cockatoos, and their much smaller cousin, the cockatiel. Their crest is used as a form of communication and is often raised to express distress, fear or as a warning to stay away, but this is not always the case. They will also display their crest in excitement and during play. The crest is also used during courting displays.

The females can sometimes be identified through the colour of their eyes, they tend to have slightly lighter, reddish/brown tinge to their iris. However this is not a consistent occurrence and many females will have the same black eye colouring of their male counterparts. The size of the head can sometimes provide a clue as to the sex of the parrot as the adult male generally has a slightly larger head. The adolescent birds resemble the adults and it is particularly difficult to tell the difference between a male and female. The only truly accurate way to determine the sex of your parrot is through DNA testing.

SIZE: Length up to about 50 cm, weighting around 850 grams

Australian Distribution of Cacatua galerita (Australian Sulphur-crested Cockatoo)

Australian Distribution of Cacatua galerita (Australian Sulphur-crested Cockatoo)

DISTRIBUTION & HABITAT: The Sulphur-crested Cockatoo is native to Australia and can be found in Tasmania, Victoria, New South Wales, and Queensland, the Northern Territory and Western Australia. Many birds that have escape or have been deliberately released are now living in areas where they do not normally occur, such as Perth and in New Zealand

They are very social birds and will congregate in very large groups with numbers in the hundreds, they tend to disperse into smaller flocks for ground feeding and reunite in the evening for roosting. The noise of hundreds of cockatoo loudly shrieking as the fly can be almost deafening. They are generally found in a variety of timbered habitats area close to a water source and they tend to stay in the same area all year round. The Cockatoo has been very successful in adapting too many man made environments, often becoming a bit of a pest, due to the damage they cause by chewing on homes and other wooden structures. The Cockatoo is often seen feeding in large flocks on the ground along roadsides and highways. with one or more members of the group watching for danger from a nearby perch.

STATUS: Protected species under the Australian Commonwealth Law.

DIET: The Sulphur-crested Cockatoo feeds mainly on seeds, grains, nuts, fruits, insects and insect larvae and roots.
Many sites recommend a combination of small parrot and/or Cockatiel seed mix, striped sunflower seeds (not too many), oats, Canary Seed, and Millets, as a basis for their seed diet, while other sites recommend parrot pellets or a combination of both. One site recommends coating the seed mix with Wheat Germ Oil to provide vitamins and prevent egg binding in their birds.

What ever your choice, make sure that 50% of your Cockatoo’s diet is a variety of clean fresh fruits and vegetables, sprouts, flowers, berries and nectar. It is very important that any uneaten or spoilt fruit is removed as soon as possible, through out the day to prevent contamination and fermentation, especially during hot humid weather. Their diet needs to be balanced and interesting. You should also supplement their diet with nuts, soaked and sprouted seed, seeding grasses, seed heads, and even egg and biscuit mix.

Cockatoos need a source of protein, which can be obtained with insectivore mixes, insect larvae, mealworms, other grubs or a protein powder. You also need to maintain adequate levels of vitamins and minerals, there are many types of mineral and vitamin blocks available. I use a mineral perch. Don’t forget the benefits of cuttlefish and shell grit. They also spend a lot of time on the ground scratching around in dirt so it is imperative that they are wormed regularly.
Cockatoos are also known to engage in geophagy, which is the practice of eating clay to detoxify their food.

Eucalyptus branches, leaves and flowers are a natural source of food but when placed throughout their enclosure they also become an important source of entertainment and exercise. Mental stimulation is extremely important for all birds in captivity. They also enjoy a dish of water for bathing or they will try to use their drinking water Change their water every day, and frequently clean their feeding bowls, toys, perches and cage or aviary to prevent contamination

Australian Sulphur Crested Cockatoo - Cacatua galerita

Australian Sulphur Crested Cockatoo - Cacatua galerita. This picture was taken by Mfunnell and located at wikipedia.org site

COMPATIBILITY: The Sulphur-crested Cockatoo is relatively non aggressive and can sometimes be housed with other parrots of a similar size, but only in suitable large enclosures and outside of the breeding season.

TEMPERAMENT: The Sulphur-crested Cockatoo are extremely intelligent and even considered by some to be one of the most intelligent parrots. They are energetic, playful, mischievous and extremely curious birds which can make them naturally entertaining and funny companions. Sulphur Crested Cockatoos can be great acrobats and many have been trained to do an amazing range of tricks.

PET STATUS: The Sulphur Crested Cockatoo can make wonderful companions for gentle, kind people who have loads of patients and heaps of time to spend bonding and entertaining this extremely intelligent bird.

Your Sulphur-crested Cockatoo can become an extremely affectionate, loyal and loving companion. They can also bond excessively to one particular person, and may even become extremely jealous if other people or birds go near their special human. They may come to see that human as a mate/spouse and can become very aggressive and lash out at anyone coming too near.

Your intelligent Sulphur-crested Cockatoo will require continuous mental stimulation and their strong social nature requires a great deal of ongoing attention and affection. If they are deprived of mental stimulation and/or attention and affection WILL become depressed and develop neurotic behaviours, including screeching, feather plucking and biting , just to name a few.

Australian Sulfur Crested Cockatoo - Cacatua galerita

Australian Sulfur Crested Cockatoo - Cacatua galerita This picture was taken by Anneke anneke and located at wikipedia.org site

TOYS: Cockatoos love to chew and destroy things, so it is really important to provide plenty of toys and objects for chewing, mental stimulation and to maintain wear on their large beaks and claws.

There are so many toys and objects available, such as swings, play gyms, cuttlefish, wooden and hard plastic toys, leather, cardboard, rope toys, wooden balls and bells. Make sure that you provide toys that you bird can pick up with their feet and beak as well as hanging toys. Make sure that all your toys are safe, and are also hung or placed in a safe location, to prevent any injury, accidental entrapment or hanging. Also treat them with vegetable flavoured and shaped wood chews, seed bells and various favourite foods serve up all around their enclosure to encourage foraging, exercise and mental stimulation.

You should include numerous and various sized perches, such as wooden perches, soft pliable perch, mineral perches and various sized branches. Natural branches offer the best variety in size, allowing them to maintain fitness and strength in their feet. I like to place fresh, leafy and/or seeded branches from Banksias, Grevilleas and Bottlebrushes, and try to create a maze effect, for simulation. seed bells are an added snack and chew bonus. Once again, make sure that all perches and branches are safe, and hung or placed in a safe location, to prevent any injury, accidental entrapment or hanging.

ABILITY TO TALK: Both the male and female Sulphur-crested Cockatoo can become wonderful talkers and fantastic sound mimickers, however many consider the male to have a better tendency to becoming a more avid conversationalist. I personal believe that it has more to do with the individual bird’s personality and the amount of time and patience that you share with your cocky while you help develop their vocabulary.

LEVEL OF NOISE: The Sulphur-crested Cockatoo is generally a quite parrot throughout most of the day but during early morning and dusk they release an exceptionally loud and penetrating screech that if you are lucky will only last through a few short outbursts. However there are always exceptional individuals who screech all throughout the day. The screech of a Sulphur-crested Cockatoo can be deafening and can really make life extremely uncomfortable for nearby neighbours.

References: (Viewing date –4th July 2008)
http://www.birdsnways.com/mowen/sc2.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulphur-crested_Cockatoo
http://www.centralpets.com/animals/birds/parrots/prt801.html
http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/finder/display.cfm?id=48
http://www.birdworld.com.au/bw_bird_index.php?birdid=galerita%20&birdg=Cacatua
http://www.faunanet.gov.au/wos/factfile.cfm?Fact_ID=433
http://exoticpets.about.com/od/cockatoos/p/cockatoos.htm
—————————————————————-

Copyright (c) 2008 All Images are covered by copyright law.
Please contact me, using the comments, if you would like to use
them so were can discuss any arrangements.
Copyright (c) 2008 All Images are covered by copyright law.
Images on this page have been sourced from others sites
and may have specific copyright, please contact them in
relation to their use. Each photo has a link back to the original site.
Some people a kind enough to allow their images to be displayed
in blogs or emails but they still maintain copyright ownership.

CLASS 2 Bird Keeper Licence in NSW, Australia

The keeping of any Class 2 Native Bird Species involves a load of enthusiasm and commitment, as they require a lot of time and skill to properly take care of these wonderful and precious birds. For it is not a right but a privilege to care for any of our precious wildlife.

The NSW CLASS 2 Bird Keeper Licence permits the holder to keep all bird species listed by the NSW CLASS 1 Bird Keeper Licence or Companion Bird Licence as well as the bird species listed below. A Class 2 licence must be obtained before any Class 2 Native Bird Species can be acquired.

To obtain a NSW CLASS 2 Bird Keeper Licence you must be over 18 years old and be able to prove that you have had at least two years worth of experience in keeping native birds. You must also show evidence that you understand the needs of the native bird species that you wish to acquire and are capable of providing all the necessary care and accommodation your birds will require.

You will need to lodge a written application addressing all this criteria before National Parks and Wildlife Service will issue a Class 2 licence.

National Parks and Wildlife Service can issue your Class 2 Licence for one, two or five years. To maintain your Class 2 Bird Keeper Licence you must maintain complete records of all bird species held, which must be submitted to the National Parks and Wildlife Service in July of each year. You and the other parties must also provide written notification on any transactions involving any Class 2 native bird species within 10 days of that transaction.

PARROTS AND COCKATOOS

S0261: Cyclopsitta diophthalma
Double-eyed Fig-Parrot
(includes: Macleay’s or
Red-browed Fig-Parrot and
Marshall’s , or
Cape York Fig Parrot)

Y8028: Cyclopsitta diophthalma coxeni
Coxen’s Fig-Parrot
Blue-browed Fig-Parrot

W0263: Probosciger aterrimus
Palm Cockatoo
Black Macaw
Cape York Cockatoo
Great Palm Cockatoo

PIGEONS AND DOVES

U0026: Ducula bicolor
Pied Imperial-Pigeon
Torresian Imperial Pigeon
Torres Straight Pigeon

Q0040: Geophaps smithii
Partridge Pigeon
Bare-eyed Pigeon

A0044: Leucosarcia melanoleuca
Wonga Pigeon

W0027: Lopholaimus antarcticus
Topknot Pigeon

C0029: Macropygia amboinensis
Brown Cuckoo-Dove
Brown Pigeon
Pheasant-tailed Pigeon

C0037: Petrophassa albipennis
White-quilled Rock-Pigeon

E0038: Petrophassa rufipennis
Chestnut-quilled Rock-Pigeon
Red-quilled Rock Pigeon

S0025: Ptilinopus magnificus
Wompoo Fruit-Dove
Magnificent Fruit Dove
Wompoo Pigeon

Z0023: Ptilinopus superbus
Superb Fruit-Dove
Purple-crowned Pigeon

QUAILS

Z0015: Turnix castanota
Chestnut-backed Button-quail
Buff-backed Quail

K0013: Turnix maculosa
Red-backed Button-quail
Black-spotted Quail
Orange-breasted Quail
Red-collared Quail

Q0016: Turnix olivii
Buff-breasted Button-quail

W0019: Turnix pyrrhothorax
Red-chested Button-quail
Chestnut-breasted Quail
Red-breasted Quail
Red-chested Quail / Turnix

FINCHES

U0650: Stagonopleura bella
Beautiful Firetail
Firetail Finch

W0651: Stagonopleura oculata
Red-eared Firetail

WATERFOWL

U0210: Anas castanea
Chestnut Teal

W0211: Anas gracilis
Grey Teal

A0212: Anas rhynchotis
Australasian Shoveler

Y0208: Anas superciliosa
Pacific Black Duck

G0215: Aythya australis
Hardhead
White-eyed Duch

M0198: Cereopsis novaehollandiae
Cape Barren Goose

U0202: Chenonetta jubata
Australian Wood Duck
Maned Goose
Wood Duck

W0203: Cygnus atratus
Black Swan

A0204: Dendrocygna arcuata
Wandering Whistling-Duck

C0205: Dendrocygna eytoni
Plumed Whistling-Duck

Q0200: Nettapus coromandelianus
Cotton Pygmy-goose
White Pygmy Goose

S0201: Nettapus pulchellus
Green Pygmy-goose

Y0216: Oxyura australis
Blue-billed Duck

E0214: Stictonetta naevosa
Freckled Duck

E0206: Tadorna radjah
Radjah Shelduck
Burdekin Duck

G0207: Tadorna tadornoides
Australian Shelduck
Mountain Duck

Z0199: Anseranas semipalmata
Magpie Goose
Pied Goose

MISCELLANEOUS & SOFTBILL SPECIES

E0046: Gallirallus philippensis
Buff-banded Rail
Banded Landrail

M0058: Porphyrio porphyrio
Purple Swamphen

G0055: Gallinula ventralis
Black-tailed Native-hen

U0174: Burhinus grallarius
Bush Stone-curlew
Bush Thick-knee

Z0147: Cladorhynchus leucocephalus
Banded Stilt

M0146: Himantopus himantopus
Black-winged Stilt
Pied Stilt

C0133: Vanellus miles
Masked Lapwing
Spur-winged Plover

G0135: Vanellus tricolor
Banded Lapwing

K0313: Podargus strigoides
Tawny Frogmouth

M0322: Dacelo novaeguineae
Laughing Kookaburra

Z0323: Dacelo leachii
Blue-winged Kookaburra

S0325: Todiramphus pyrrhopygia
Red-backed Kingfisher

U0326: Todiramphus sanctus
Sacred Kingfisher

E0354: Pitta iris
Rainbow Pitta

A0352: Pitta versicolor
Noisy Pitta

W0539: Malurus amabilis
Lovely Fairy-wren

S0529: Malurus cyaneus
Superb Fairy-wren
Blue Wren

U0538: Malurus elegans – Red-winged Fairy-wren
Q0536: Malurus lamberti – Variegated Fairy-wren
Z0535: Malurus leucopterus – White-winged Fairy-wren
K0541: Malurus melanocephalus – Red-backed Fairy-wren
Y0540: Malurus pulcherrimus – Blue-breasted Fairy-wren
Y0532: Malurus splendens – Splendid Fairy-wren
C0513: Amytornis striatus – Striated Grasswren
C0493: Sericornis citreogularis – Yellow-throated Scrubwren
Y0488: Sericornis frontalis – White-browed Scrubwren
Q0640: Acanthagenys rufogularis – Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
E0646: Philemon citreogularis – Little Friarbird
C0645: Philemon corniculatus – Noisy Friarbird
S0641: Entomyzon cyanotis – Blue-faced Honeyeater
W0619: Lichenostomus melanops – Yellow-tufted Honeyeater
S0625: Lichenostomus penicillatus – White-plumed Honeyeater
K0605: Meliphaga lewinii – Lewin’s Honeyeater
M0586: Myzomela sanguinolenta - Scarlet Honeyeater
Q0632: Phylidonyris nigra – White-cheeked Honeyeater
Z0631 Phylidonyris novaehollandiae – New Holland Honeyeater
G0591 Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris – Eastern Spinebill
Q0448 Epthianura albifrons White-fronted Chat
E0450 Epthianura aurifrons – Orange Chat
S0449 Ephthianura tricolor – Crimson Chat
Q0392 Eopsaltria australis - Eastern Yellow Robin
K0381 Petroica goodenovii – Red-capped Robin
Y0380 Petroica multicolor - Scarlet Robin
M0382 Petroica phoenicea – Flame Robin
A0572 Nectarinia jugularis – Yellow-bellied Sunbird
Q0640 Acanthagenys rufogularis – Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater
S0421 Psophodes olivaceus – Eastern Whipbird
G0671 Oriolus sagittatus – Olive-backed Oriole
A0432 Sphecotheres viridis – Figbird
U0546 Artamus cinereus – Black-faced Woodswallow
W0547 Artamus cyanopterus – Dusky Woodswallow
S0545 Artamus superciliosus – White-browed Woodswallow
Z0675 Struthidea cinerea – Apostlebird
Q0676 Ailuroedus crassirostris – Green Catbird
Y0680 Chlamydera maculata - Spotted Bowerbird
W0679 Ptilonorhynchus violaceus – Satin Bowerbird
Q0684 Sericulus chrysocephalus – Regent Bowerbird
A0564 Dicaeum hirundinaceum – Mistletoebird
E0574 Zosterops lateralis – Silvereye
M0674 Aplonis metallica – Metallic Starling

Class 1 and Companion Bird Licences in NSW

A Class 1 Bird Keeper Licence or Companion Bird Licence covers many common species of native bird that are usually obtained from licensed pet shops and require only a basic knowledge of bird care to be successfully raised and maintained in captivity.

You must contact National Parks and Wildlife Service to purchase a Class 1, or Companion Bird Licence before you purchase any of the species of native bird, classified under these licences. National Parks and Wildlife Service can issue your Class 1 Licence for either two or five years. To maintain your Class 1 Licence you must maintain complete records of your birds, which must be submitted to the National Parks and Wildlife Service in July of each year. National Parks and Wildlife Service will issue your Companion Bird Licence for five years, and you must notify them about the source of the bird, which you require the licence for.

The following species may be kept under a CLASS 1 BIRD KEEPER LICENCE OR COMPANION BIRD LICENCE.

FINCHES

Z0659: Heteromun apectoralis
Pictorella Mannikin
Pictorella
White-breasted Finch

K0657: Lonchura castaneothorax
Chestnut-breasted Mannikin
Chestnut-breasted Finch
Chestnut-breasted Munia
Barley Sparrow

M0658: Lonchura flaviprymna
Yellow-rumped Mannikin
White-headed Finch
Yellow-rumped Munia
Yellow-tailed Finch

C0661: Neochmia modesta
Plum-headed Finch
Plumhead

Y0664: Neochmia phaeton
Crimson Finch
Blood Finch

E0662: Neochmia temporalis
Red-browed Finch
Redhead
Sydney Waxbill

M0666: Poephila acuticauda
Long-tailed Finch
Black-heart Finch
Heck’s Finch

Z0667: Poephila cincta
Black-throated Finch
Chocolate Parson
Diggles Finch
Parson Finch
Black-rumped Parson
White-rumped Parson

S0669: Poephila personata
Masked Finch
White-eared Finch
White-cheeked Masked Finch
Cape York Masked Finch

A0652: Stagonopleura guttata
Diamond Firetail
Diamond Sparrow
Spotted-sided Finch

G0655: Taeniopygia bichenovii
Double-barred Finch
Banded Finch
Banded Owl Finch
Bicheno’s Finch
Black-banded Finch
Owl-faced Finch

COCKATOOS
Any transactions of COCKATOO species listed under CLASS 1 licence require written notification of from both parties within 10 days of all transaction. This is in addition to the annual submitting of all fauna records, every July.

U0270: Cacatua leadbeateri
Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo
Leadbeater’s Cockatoo
Pink Cockatoo
Wee Juggler

Y0268: Callocephalon fimbriatum
Gang-gang Cockatoo

A0264: Calyptorhynchus banksii
Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo
Banksian Cockatoo
Red-tailed Cockatoo

E0266: Calyptorhynchus baudinii
Long-billed Black-Cockatoo
Baudin’s Cockatoo
White-tailed Black Cockatoo

G0267: Calyptorhynchus funereus
Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoo
Funereal Cockatoo
Yellow-eared Cockatoo

C0265: Calyptorhynchus lathami
Glossy Black-Cockatoo
Casuarina Cockatoo
Leach’s Black Cockatoo

S0794: Calyptorhynchus latirostris
Short-billed Black-Cockatoo
Carnaby’s Cockatoo
White-tailed Black Cockatoo

LORIKEETS

G0259: Glossopsitta porphyrocephala
Purple-crowned Lorikeet
Blue Keet / Lorikeet

Q0260: Glossopsitta pusilla
Little Lorikeet
Gizzle
Little Keet / Lory
Red-faced Keet / Lorikeet

C0257: Psitteuteles versicolor
Varied Lorikeet
Red-crowned Lorikeet
Red-capped Lorikeet

ROSELLAS

K0285: Platycercus caledonicus
Green Rosella
Tasmanian Rosella

E0282: Platycercus elegans
Crimson Rosella
Mountain Lowrie

Z0287: Platycercus venustus
Northern Rosella
Smutty Rosella

GRASS PARROTS

A0300: Psephotus chrysopterygius
Golden-shouldered Parrot
Ant-bed Parrot
Golden-winged Parrot

Q0296: Psephotus varius
Mulga Parrot
Many-coloured Parrot
Varied Grass Parrot

M0306: Neophema chrysostoma
Blue-winged Parrot
Blue-banded Grass Parrot/Parakeet
Hobart Ground Parrot

Q0308: Neophema petrophila
Rock Parrot
Rock Elegant Parrot / Parrakeet

E0302: Neophema pulchella Turquoise Parrot
Beautiful Grass Parrot / Parakeet
Red-shouldered Grass Parrot
Turk
Turquisine Parrot

S0297: Northiella haematogaster
Blue Bonnet (except N.h.narethae)
Bulloak Parrot
Crimson-bellied Parrot
Eastern Blue Bonnet
Oak Parrot
Pine Parrot
Red-vented Blue Bonnet

U0298: Northiella narethae Naretha
Blue Bonnet
Little Blue Bonnet
Naretha Parrot

OTHER PARROTS

C0281: Alisterus scapularis
Australian King-Parrot
King Parrot

A0280: Aprosmictus erythropterus
Red-winged Parrot
Crimson-winged Parrot

G0291: Barnardius zonarius barnardi
Mallee Ringneck
Buln Buln
Eastern Ringneck
Mallee Parrot

Y0292: Barnardius zonarius macgillivrayi
Cloncurry Parrot
Cloncurry Ringneck

K8029: Eclectus roratus macgilivrayi
Australian Eclectus Parrot

M0278: Polytelis anthopeplus
Regent Parrot
Murray Smoker
Rock Pebbler

K0277: Polytelis swainsonii
Superb Parrot
Barraband
Green Leek

S0309: Lathamus discolor
Swift Parrot
Clink
Red-faced Parrot
Red-shouldered Parrot
Swift Lorikeet

PIGEONS AND DOVES

A0028: Columba leucomela
White-headed Pigeon
Baldy Pigeon

U0042: Geophaps plumifera
Spinifex Pigeon
Plumed Pigeon

G0039: Geophaps scripta
Squatter Pigeon

W0035: Phaps elegans
Brush Bronzewing
Little Bronzewing

A0036: Phaps histrionica
Flock Bronzewing
Flock Pigeon

K0021: Ptilinopus regina
Rose-crowned Fruit-Dove
Red-crowned Fruit Dove

QUAILS

S0017: Turnix melanogaster
Black-breasted Button-quail
Black-breasted Quail / Turnix

Exempt Species of Native Bird in NSW, Australia

In New South Wales all native birds are protected by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Act.
It is illegal to take any native birds from the wild.
All exotic (non-native) birds may be held without a licence and 41 native bird species have been exempted from this licensing. They are as follows:

PARROTS

  • Bourke’s Parrot,
  • Budgerigar,
  • Cockatiel,
  • Cockatoo – Sulphur-crested,
  • Corella – Little,
  • Corella – Long-billed,
  • Corella -Western,
  • Elegant Parrot,
  • Galah,
  • Hooded Parrot,
  • Lorikeet – Musk,
  • Lorikeet – Rainbow,
  • Lorikeet – Red-collared,
  • Lorikeet – Scaly-breasted,
  • Port Lincoln Parrot,
  • Princess Parrot,
  • Red-capped Parrot,
  • Red-rumped Parrot,
  • Rosella – Adelaide,
  • Rosella – Eastern,
  • Rosella – Pale-headed,
  • Rosella – Western,
  • Rosella – Yellow,
  • Scarlet-chested Parrot,
  • Twenty-eight Parrot,

DOVES & PIGEONS

  • Bar-shouldered Dove,
  • Diamond Dove,
  • Emerald Dove,
  • Peaceful Dove,
  • Common Bronzewing,
  • Crested Pigeon,

QUAILS

  • Brown Quail,
  • King Quail,
  • Stubble Quail,
  • Little Button-Quail,
  • Painted Button-Quail,

FINCHES

  • Blue-faced Parrot-Finch,
  • Gouldian Finch,
  • Painted Finch,
  • Star Finch and
  • Zebra Finch.

These 41 native bird species are exempted from NSW licensing requirements, because their wild populations are regarded to be of limited risk from aviculture.These 41 native bird species can be kept and traded withhin NSW without a NSW Bird Keeper Licence.